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Month: March 2016

Mistress of Animals — manuscript finished

Posted in Broken Devices, Mistress of Animals, Publishing, Release, and The Chained Adept

Little_Gray_Mouse_-_The_EndWell, I wrote the last scene of Mistress of Animals this morning. Yippee!

Just a good bit of editing, then formatting and the usual distribution headaches. Everything's on schedule for a publication date of April 2.

Broken Devices, Book 3 of The Chained Adept, begins tomorrow. I've discovered I like writing absolutely every day, highest priority. Not until that's done do I look at any other necessary work. So right now, that means I will begin work on the next book, and do the edits on this one after the day's writing is over.

Perkunas

Posted in A Writer's Desk, and Language

perkunas(triumverate)My books are published by Perkunas Press, and every now and then someone asks about the origin of the name “Perkunas”.

In the picture above, he's the guy in the middle: Perkunas, the Baltic god of, well, many things. In this instance, he represents maturity and power, vs age and death on the left, and youth and fertility on the right.

More commonly, Perkunas is shown with a thunderbolt.  He is the champion of good, feared by all evil spirits. He rights wrongs, and upholds the balance of the world.

PerkunasminiHis clear counterpart in the Nordic countries is Thor, and there is a long and tangled relationship between them. The details are buried in lost history and intriguingly suggestive Indo-European etymology.

The root for “oak” in Indo-European is *perku (the “*” indicates a reconstructed form, IE being unattested except by its daughter languages). We see that word reflected in Latin: quercus (oak), and there is a general association of oak trees and lightning in Indo-European mythologies. Gods of oak trees are gods of thunder, and they wield thunderbolts (with emphasis on the pounding aspect of lightning rather than the flash).

perkunas_In Norse mythology, there are two tantalizingly references to obscure gods: Fjörgyn and Fjörgynn. The former (female) is mentioned briefly as the wife of Odin and mother of Thor, and the second (male) is mentioned as a byname for Odin. Etymologically, Fjörgyn is related to the same Indo-European word and seems to be another form of Perkunas. Lots of speculation exists about what this means in the relationship of the Norse with their Baltic neighbors.

Cover reveal for Mistress of Animals

Posted in Artwork, Mistress of Animals, and The Chained Adept

I thought you might like to see how the cover came out for Mistress of Animals, book 2 of The Chained Adept.

Once again, my cover artist, Jake Bullock, did an excellent job. I sent him a scene from the book which I can't share with you because of spoilers, but the “Mistress of Animals” is a young teenage girl, another chained wizard, and not one of the good guys.

He came up with two entirely different treatments, of which I liked this one best.

Mistress-of-Animals-Sketches-1